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Add Photo Mounts To A Photo With Photoshop – Part 2

Written by Steve Patterson.
In part 1 of this Photoshop tutorial, we learned how to create and save a simple photo mount. In this part, we’ll take the photo mount and add multiple copies of it to the corners of an image! This part of the tutorial assumes you’ve already completed the first part and have your photo mount ready to go, so be sure to work your way through part 1 first if you haven’t already.

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Here, once again, is the final result we’re working towards, with the mounts displayed in the corners of the photo:

Photoshop photo mounts effect. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The final photo mounts effect.

Let’s get started!

Step 1: Open Your Image

Open the image you want to add the photo mounts to. Here’s the photo I’ll be using (be sure to save a copy of the image before continuing in case you need access to the original in the future). If you still have the photo mount open from part 1 of the tutorial, the image will open in a separate document window:

A photo of a newly wed couple. Image licensed from iStockphoto by Photoshop Essentials.com.
Open the photo you’ll be adding the mounts to.

Step 2: Duplicate The Background Layer

With the photo newly opened, if we look in the Layers panel, we see that we currently have one layer, the Background layer, which is the layer the photo is sitting on. We need to make a copy of the layer, so go up to the Layer menu at the top of the screen, choose New, and then choose Layer via Copy. Or, for a faster way to access the same command, press Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac) on your keyboard:

Go to Layer > New > Layer via Copy. Image licensed from iStockphoto by Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Layer > New > Layer via Copy.

Either way adds a copy of the layer, which Photoshop names “Layer 1″, above the original Background layer:

A copy of the Background layer appears in the Layers panel. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
A copy of the image appears above the original in the Layers panel.

Step 3: Add Extra Canvas Space

Let’s add some extra white canvas space around the photo. Go up to the Image menu at the top of the screen and choose Canvas Size:

Go to Image > Canvas Size. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Image > Canvas Size.

When the Canvas Size dialog box appears, enter 1 inch for both the Width and Height and make sure the Relative option is checked so we add to the existing canvas. Also, make sure the center square in the Anchor grid is selected so the extra space is added around the image equally. Finally, set the canvas color at the bottom of the dialog box to White:

The Canvas Size dialog box in Photoshop. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The Canvas Size dialog box.

Click OK when you’re done, and the extra white canvas space appears around the edges of the image:

The image after adding extra canvas space in Photoshop. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The extra canvas space appears in white around the photo.

Step 4: Add A Border Around The Photo

Before we add our photo mounts to the corners, let’s add a thin border around the edges of the photo. With Layer 1 selected, click on the Layer Styles icon at the bottom of the Layers panel:

Click the Layer Styles icon in the Layers panel. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Click on the Layer Styles icon.

Choose Stroke from the bottom of the list of layer styles:

Select the Stroke layer style. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Click Stroke to select it.

This opens the Layer Style dialog box set to the Stroke options in the middle column. First, click on the color swatch to the right of the word Color and choose a light gray from the Color Picker. Click OK to exit out of the Color Picker when you’re done. Change the Position of the stroke to Inside, then increase the size of the stroke by dragging the Size slider towards the right. The actual size you use for your stroke will depend on the size and resolution of your image so keep an eye on the document window as you drag the slider to judge the results. I’m going to set my stroke size to 24 px:

Set the options for the Stroke. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The Stroke options in the Layer Style dialog box.

Click OK when you’re done to close out of the dialog box. You should now have a thin light gray border around the image:

The image after adding a border with a Stroke layer style. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The Stroke layer style works great for adding borders to photos.

Step 5: Copy The Photo Mount

Open your photo mount document that you created in part 1 of the tutorial if it’s not open already. Select the Photo mount layer in the Layers panel, then press Ctrl+A (Win) / Command+A (Mac) to select the entire layer. Press Ctrl+C (Win) / Command+C (Mac) to copy the layer to the clipboard:

Copying the Photo mount layer. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Open the photo mount document, then copy the photo mount to the clipboard.

Step 6: Paste The Photo Mount Into The Image

Switch back over to the document window that contains your image, then press Ctrl+V (Win) / Command+V (Mac) to paste the photo mount into the document. The photo mount will appear in the center of the image, which obviously isn’t where we need it, and it will probably appear too large, but we’ll fix both of these problems in a moment:

The photo mount has been pasted into the image. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Paste the photo mount into the image document.

Step 7: Move And Resize The Photo Mount With Free Transform

Go up to the Edit menu at the top of the screen and choose Free Transform, or press Ctrl+T (Win) / Command+T (Mac) to quickly select it with the keyboard shortcut:

Go to Edit > Free Transform. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Edit > Free Transform.

This places the Free Transform bounding box and handles around the photo mount. Move the photo mount into the bottom right corner of the image by clicking anywhere inside the bounding box, keeping your mouse button held down, and dragging it with your mouse into position. To resize the photo mount, hold down your Shift key and drag any of the corner handles. Holding the Shift key down will constrain the aspect ratio of the photo mount so you don’t accidentally distort the shape of it as you’re resizing it. You can also nudge the photo mount into place using the arrow keys on your keyboard. Press Enter (Win) / Return (Mac) when you’re done to accept the transformation and exit out of Free Transform:

Moving and resizing the photo mount with Free Transform. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Use Free Transform to resize the photo mount and move it into the bottom right corner.

Step 8: Duplicate The Photo Mount

Press Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac) to duplicate the photo mount. Not much will happen in the document window, but a copy of the photo mount will appear above the original in the Layers panel:

A copy of the photo mount appears in the Layers panel. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Press Ctrl+J (Win) / Command+J (Mac) to make a copy of the photo mount.

Step 9: Flip The Copy Vertically

With the top layer in the Layers panel selected, go back up to the Edit menu, choose Transform, then choose Flip Vertical. You’ll see the copy of the photo mount flip vertically above the original in the document window:

Go to Edit > Transform > Flip Vertical. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Edit > Transform > Flip Vertical.

Step 10: Move The Copy Into The Top Right Corner

Press the letter V on your keyboard to quickly select Photoshop’s Move Tool. Hold down your Shift key, then click on the flipped photo mount and, while keeping your mouse button held down, drag it upward into the top right corner of the image. Holding down the Shift key will limit the direction you can drag in, making it easier to drag the photo mount straight up. Again, you can nudge the photo mount into place if needed with the arrow keys:

Moving the photo mount into the top right corner of the image. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Use the Move Tool to drag the photo mount into the top right corner.

Step 11: Select Both Photo Mount Layers At Once

With the top layer still selected in the Layers panel, hold down your Ctrl (Win) / Command (Mac) key and click on the layer directly below it. This will select both photo mount layers at once (you’ll see them both highlighted in blue):

Selecting both photo mount layers at once. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Select both photo mount layers.

Step 12: Copy And Drag The Photo Mounts Over To The Left

With both photo mount layers selected and the Move Tool still selected, hold down Shift+Alt (Win) / Shift+Option (Mac) and, again keeping your mouse button held down, drag the photo mounts over to the left edge of the image. Holding the Shift key will again limit the direction you can drag so it’s easier to drag straight across, while holding the Alt (Win) / Option (Mac) key tells Photoshop to create copies of the photo mounts rather than moving the originals. You should now see four photo mounts in the document. The two on the left will be facing the wrong way, but we’ll fix that next:

Moving copies of the photo mounts to the left side of the photo. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Hold Shift+Alt (Win) / Shift+Option (Mac) and drag copies of the photo mounts to the left.

Step 13: Flip The Left Photo Mounts Horizontally

Go back up to the Edit menu at the top of the screen, choose Transform, and this time, choose Flip Horizontal:

Go to Edit > Transform > Flip Horizontal. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Edit > Transform > Flip Horizontal.

The two photo mounts on the left side of the image will flip horizontally. Use the left or right arrow keys on your keyboard to nudge them into position if needed:

The left photo mounts have been flipped horizontally. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The left photo mounts are now facing the right direction.

Step 14: Trim Away The Extra White Space

As an optional final step, if you want to trim away the extra white space around the image and photo mounts, go up to the Image menu at the top of the screen and choose Trim:

Go to Image > Trim. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Go to Image > Trim.

When the Trim dialog box appears, select Top Left Pixel Color, and make sure Top, Bottom, Left, and Right are all selected in the bottom half of the dialog box. This tells Photoshop to trim away everything that’s the same color as the pixel in the top left of the document (which is white), and to trim it from all four sides of the document:

The Trim dialog box in Photoshop. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
Choose Top Left Pixel Color.

Click OK to exit out of the dialog box, and Photoshop trims away all of the extra white space, leaving us with our final result:

Photoshop photo mounts effect. Image © 2010 Photoshop Essentials.com.
The final photo mounts effect.

And there we have it! That’s how to add photo mounts to an image with Photoshop!

Download our tutorials as print-ready PDFs! Learning Photoshop has never been easier!

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